• A. Gulvin Translation

Are You Bored, or Are You Boring?

Updated: Jun 25, 2018


The confusion between -ed and -ing adjectives can be a problem for lots of English learners when trying to improve their #grammar. The rule is fairly simple, so let's take a look:

-ed: describes how somebody is feeling about something
-ing: describes the thing/person that causes the feeling

For instance, you might send a text during maths to your best friend sitting on the other side of the classroom...

I'M BORED :O [YAWN]

and she might text you back with...

TELL ME ABOUT IT! THIS TEACHER MAKES MATHS SO BOOOOOOORING

You are feeling bored because the maths class is boring. (Of course, we chose maths as an example subject here because there's no way you'd ever find English boring....... right? :D )


Be aware that the -ing adjectives can be used to describe people as well as things. This is one reason it's important not to get the two varieties muddled up. You don't want to end up calling yourself boring!


I'M BORED :O [yawn]
TELL ME ABOUT IT! THIS TEACHER IS SO BOOOOOOORING!

In this example, you are feeling bored because the teacher is boring.


Once you've got the hang of this simple rule, you can put lots of great adjectives to work and make your English more exciting. (This will make your English teacher excited... )


tired/tiring

excited/exciting

interested/interesting

annoyed/annoying

exhausted/exhausting

humiliated/humiliating

amused/amusing

worried/worrying

shocked/shocking

disappointed/disappointing

surprised/surprising

terrified/terrifying

satisfied/satisfying

depressed/depressing

embarrassed/embarrassing

frightened/frightening

captivated/captivating

relaxed/relaxing

inspired/inspiring

motivated/motivating...


Can you think of any others? Leave them for us in a comment!

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